Boracay one of the most amazing beaches in the world

Boracay is a small island of the Philippines located south of Manila.
It very is famous for it’s white sand beautiful beaches, as a whole the beaches of the Philippines have built them self quite a reputation as being some of the most amazing beaches in the world.

Boracay is a small island in the Philippines located approximately 315 km (196 mi) south of Manila and 2 km off the northwest tip of Panay Islandin the Western Visayas region of the Philippines. Boracay Island and its beaches have received awards from numerous travel publications and agencies. The island comprises the barangays of Manoc-Manoc, Balabag, and Yapak municipality of Malay, province of Aklan. The island is administered by the Philippine Tourism Authority and the provincial government of Aklan. Apart from its white sand beaches, Boracay is also famous for being one of the world’s top destination for relaxation. It is also emerging among the top destinations for tranquility and nightlife

Year 2012, Boracay was awarded as the best island in the world from the international travel magazine

Davinci Rotating Tower!!

The Dynamic Tower (also known as Dynamic Architecture Building or the Da Vinci Tower) is a planned 420-metre (1,378 ft), 80-floor moving skyscraper in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, designed by architect David Fisher. The 68-story tower will feature floors that can be individually rotated via voice commands. Similar to the Suite Vollard completed in 2001 in Brazil, each floor
will be able to rotate independently. This will result in a constantly changing shape of the tower. Each floor will rotate at maximum of 6 metres (20 ft) per minute, or one full rotation in 90 minutes. It will be the world’s first prefabricated skyscraper with 40 factory-built modules for each floor. The entire tower will be powered from wind turbines and solar panels. Enough surplus electricity should be produced to power five other similar sized buildings in the vicinity. The turbines will be located between each of the rotating floors.

The amazing road from Shimla to the Himalayas.

India’s Himalayan roadways are among the oldest on the planet. Dating back to 206 B.C., the Himalayas were an integral part of the famous Silk Routes, connecting Central Asia with South Asia, and creating a bridge between the culturally and religiously diverse countries of India, China, Afghanistan, Nepal and Bhutan.
Starting out on NH22 in Shimla, the “highway” heads northeast through the town of Rampur, onto the villages of Tapri, Karcham, Kuppa,and Kalpa. Cut somewhat haphazardly out of mountain cliff-sides, parts of NH22 have earned fear-inducing nicknames like “Freefall Freeway,” “The Cutouts,” “Breakaway Bend,” “The Ledge” and “Angry Mountain.”In many places along “the Cutouts,” only enough rock has been blasted out of the mountains to allow one vehicle to pass at a time. The drivers have to both be aware of the 1,000-foot cliff they’re driving along and scraping the top of their truck on the rock ceiling. “Breakaway Bend” challenges drivers to dangers of the unnatural kind–too much blasting has weakened the mountain from below, leading to not only potholes, but, in some places, total roadway failure. The road could give away from under the wheels of the truck at any moment

Magic Mushrooms ~ Cookeina Speciosa

Cookeina is a genus of cup fungi in the family Sarcoscyphaceae, members of which may be found in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Species may be found on fallen branches of angiosperms, trunks, and sometimes on fruits. The Temuans of Peninsular Malaysia are reported to use certain species from this genus as food,
and also as a bait for fishing, where it is rubbed against the hook.

When mature apothecia become filled with water, the asci absorb some of that water and develop a Turgor pressure, a hydrostatic pressure within the ascus which put pressure on the tip of the ascus, held in place by the rigid ascus wall. As the water level in the cup reduces due to evaporation, the asci tips dry out, resulting in a negative vapor pressure that ultimately results in the thin tissue at the wall of the apex (the operculum) breaking outward, releasing the spores