The Deepest Indoor Swimming Pool in the World!

Located in Brussels, Belgium, Nemo 33 is the deepest indoor swimming pool in the world. Designed for divers, Nemo 33 was first conceived by John Beernaerts in 1996. Its doors would eventually open to the public on May 1st, 2004.

According to the Guinness World Records:
The Nemo 33 diving pool has a depth of 33 meters (108 ft) at its deepest point and contains around 2.5 million litres (550,000 gal, 4.4 million pints, 660,000 US gallons) of water. The facility, which opened in June 2004, is used for dive training, leisure diving, and research.
The water is kept at a constant 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit) thanks to a large array of solar panels. There are two ‘basins’ and three ‘pits’, the deepest of which is 6 m (19 ft 7 in) across and drops to 33 m (108 ft). There are underwater ‘caves’ for exploration and three air-filled diving bells that enable diving instructors to communicate with their charges without returning to the surface.

African tribe

An anthropologist proposed a game to the kids in an African tribe. He put a basket full of fruit near a tree and told the kids that who ever got there first won the sweet fruits. When he told them to run they all took each others hands and ran together, then sat together enjoying their treats. When he asked them why they had run like that as one could have had all the fruits for himself they said: ”UBUNTU, how can one of us be happy if all the other ones are sad?”
‘UBUNTU’ in the Xhosa culture means: “I am because we are”

amazing sculptures

Willard Wigan creates amazing sculptures that fit inside the eye of a needle.

Duringthe creation process, the artist has to control his nervous system to make sure

that he does not suddenly move and destroy the sculpture.

Esquel meteorite

This Esquel meteorite was found in Chubut, Argentina in 1951 by a rancher digging a cattle pond. A single mass weighing more than 700 kilograms was found. Despite more than 50 years of searching, no more pieces of this rare pallasite have been recovered.
This specimen is a partial slice, cut thin enough to show very nice translucency of the olivine crystals, yet thick enough to maintain the beautiful green color. If Esquel is cut too thin, the crystal color fades to a light yellow instead of emerald green. This is a truly museum-quality specimen.